In this generative one-day masterclass with Christina Olivares, we’ll be engaging all of our senses—and permitting those senses to connect with dreams and memory— to create poems that “make sense” of place, time, body, and self. We will play with abstract, lyrical and narrative kinds of poem-making, and participants will have the freedom to develop a mini-sequence that sensually locates a particular moment in time.

CHRISTINA OLIVARES is the author of No Map of the Earth Includes Stars, winner of the 2014 Marsh Hawk Poetry Prize, of Interrupt, a chaplet published by Belladonna* Collaborative, and of the forthcoming full-length Seed/Archive (tentatively titled), winner of the Vinyl/Yes Yes 2014 prize. She has received two Travel and Study Grants from the Jerome Foundation, a 2015 Lower Manhattan Cultural Council residency, and has just won a 2018 Bronx Council on the Arts Nonfiction grant. Olivares is a queer Cubanx-American poet and K-12 educator from the Bronx in New York City.

DATE: Friday, July 20, 2018
TIME: 10-3PM (w/ 1 hour break from 12-1pm.)
VENUE: tbd
FEE: Rs. 1,000
APPLICATION: Due no later than 12noon on THURSDAY, 19th July. *We’ll be selecting 12 participants for this masterclass.*

Apply HERE

WOW- Women of the World – is a global movement of festivals and the people who make them. It is a festival of talks, debates, performances, activism, workshops, food, music, exhibitions, mentoring and more. WOW festivals are high-profile, mainstream platforms to celebrate women and girls, and look at the obstacles they face across the world. They are a place where hundreds of women’s stories can be shared, feelings vented, minds influenced and fun had. Each WOW is for everyone, bold and broad-based in approach, lively and serious, bringing together of people from all corners of society.

We’re going to be at WOW Kathmandu 2018 festival!
 

We believe that a place is shaped by its stories and a story is shaped by many places. Armed with three large maps of Kathmandu and Nepal, we’ll be collecting personal stories + memories that are tied to specific physical spaces. Come share your story with us. Come write amongst Kathmandu’s fiercest women.

Venue: IOE, Pulchowk Campus
Time: 11AM onwards
Download program schedule
https://www.facebook.com/events/177033996404258

Writing Workshop for Quixote Cove’s Staff/Team
June 21-23, 2017

The focus of the workshop will be to understand our own writing processes. We may think that we don’t have a set process, but we all do; having no concrete process is still a process. We will tap into conscious and unconscious thoughts through various writing exercises that may help us get closer to clarifying the transference of thoughts into words that eventually meet a reader’s eyes.

With the help of various fiction (prose, poetry, plays) and non-fictional texts (memoirs, essays, graphic stories), we will explore our relationship with self, with our audience(s), voice and style, and work towards structuring our thoughts in writing in a way that serves us (and the entire world!) better.

Also, we may or may not have ice-cream at the end of the workshop.

Writing is serious business #DontTellUsToSmile

 

*KathaSatha offers closed-group writing workshops as staff trainings and team-building exericses for organizations. Please enquire for customised sessions: kathasatha@gmail.com*

 

 

We went to Yangshila, Morang, to visit our friends at KTK-BELT Studio, who are doing incredible work of building outdoor learning grounds over 100 acres of Terai and Mahabharat range lands.

 

 

 

While in Yangshila, we worked with 22 bright-eyed students from Sawitri High School in Yangshila, Morang. These young writers came to the workshop from grades 6 through 9: we learned to snap our fingers, write about our favourite foods, listen to tall tales collected on the Sikti Trail, make up stories of people we have never met, and giggle while listening to our own recorded voices. All in all, an excellent hot afternoon of writing.

 

A Writing Workshop with Muna Gurung from KathaSatha
in collaboration with Srijanalaya & Word Warriors for Kathmandu Triennale 2017

March 30- April 1, 2017

Magic doesn’t simply happen, it’s created. They liken these magic moments in art and writing to serendipitous accidents that catch and hold the eye, the ears and the heart. But accidents need not be rootless; accidents can be intentional and purposeful. They can be created and curated. This workshop aims to demystify the creative process. Participants will take playful risks with words by stretching their boundaries of storytelling through a series of guided exercises that enable them to create serendipitous moments in their work.

*Open to writers, poets, musicians, artists writing in Nepali and English. Please note that instructions and conversations during the workshop will be carried out in English.*

                

One of our favourite writing exercises is to use Joe Brainard’s epic poem, “I Remember,” as a structural tool to collect memories, secrets, stories, and warm up our writing muscles. Here are “I Remember” excerpts from some participants of Birds of a Feather: Stories of Home & Migrations, a writing workshop in collaboration w/ Queens Memory Project, July 29, 2016:

 

window

© KathaSatha


I remember when I arrived [in] this country and everything called my attention.
I remember when I went to Time Square to look at tourists watching me.
I remember when my sister talked to me about life and what we could do with ours.
I remember my grandmother making orange juice and scolding her grandchildren for riding bikes for miles when she had breakfast prepared for us.
I remember making a mud cake in a place house in the lilac bushes.
I remember sneaking upstairs in my grandparents’ farmhouse and putting on wooden Dutch clogs– how they swallowed my tiny feet.
I remember finding the Dutch clogs years later, after my grandmother came home from the Haitian mission, and expecting them to swallow my feet. To my amazement they didn’t fit.
I remember tearing the pages out of my journal that weren’t happy enough.
I remember going to Girl Scouts and not joining because I was afraid to speak.
I remember moving to Brooklyn and my dad asking me why the bridge was packed. It was Pride Weekend. I didn’t want to try and explain.
I remember making friends with a fuzzy black cat who hung around the church next door.
I remember sitting alone in my room, using my cabinet as a computer desk, and my blow-up mattress all lumpy.
I remember the trick step on the 3rd floor and the Barbie pink walls.
I remember the day my family left me behind.
I remember strangers look at me with sympathetic stares.
I remember the day when I looked at my mom as though she was a stranger.
I remember the nice guy sitting next to me on the plane who offered me his grapefruit juice.
I remember walking on the ledge watching Harlem spread out in front of me.
I remember my father telling me, “This will be your last shoulder ride kid,” too many times.
I remember the story of the war was the same as what I had read the day before and the day before that. It wasn’t going to get any better until it ended. The end of the war would signify another, different problem. But his daughter is here and he loves her as much as he could love anyone.
I remember my hot, NYC outings: sizzling, scorching, steaming mid-day sojourns with my Irish mother to the East River paradise awaiting just the two of us.

///

What do YOU remember? We hope you take some time to write your own “I Remember” poem.

Gladys Weaver (nee Simpkins) poses with her son, Lester, at the construction site of their future home. Gladys married John Weaver in 1947 and gave birth to their son, Lester, in 1951. The couple moved into the completed Merrick Park Garden co-op immediately after it was built. Gladys Weaver [1951], Queens Memory Collection, Queens Library.

Birds of a Feather: Stories of Home & Migrations
Queens Library-Jackson Heights
July 29, 2016 / 3-5PM

When you think of home, where do you arrive? Do you have untold stories hidden in your photo albums? Do you have stories that your family tells over and over again? What are the stories that only you can tell? You haven’t found them yet?

Perfect!

Join KathaSatha and Queens Memory Project for a storytelling workshop* where you will write and share personal stories that may explore ideas of home and migrations. Participants are encouraged to bring 2-3 personal and family photos that may help in telling their stories. Facilitator, Muna Gurung, will lead the workshop with a series of writing exercises that involve images and words. No participant will be turned away for not possessing photos. No prior writing experience required.

 

* The session will be led in English. At the consent of the writer, stories from the workshop will be published on Queens Memory Project and KathaSatha web platforms. Registration is required. To register, you may do so on your own, see a librarian, or contact Yingwen Huang at 718-990-8532 / yingwen.huang@queenslibrary.org. 

WHAT’S YOUR NEW YORK STORY?

KathaSatha was in Woodside, Queens, on June 4, 2016 for the Weekend Walks festival organized by Woodside On The Move, Inc. It was the first time we collected sticky-note stories from New York *ON* the streets of New York.

We got 42 new stories! Our youngest storyteller? A 6-year-old writer.

Watch our Facebook space for these micro-stories.

3rd PrizIMG_2098 - Version 2e (Rs. 1000 + Publication):
Saturday Afternoon, Elen Turner

2nd Prize (Rs. 2000 + Publication):
Tea At Mangalbazar, Yukta Bajracharya

1st Prize (Rs. 3000 + Publication):
Souls and Stones, Sneha Shakya

Honourable Mentions: 
Ashok Hall, Saayad Ashok
Elegy, Samyak Shertok

CONGRATULATIONS to all our “Walk With Me: Patan Edition” winners!

A few words from Prajwal Parajuly:

“This was exciting. I was looking forward to reading the entries. Some pieces, however, needed time. When a prompt demands that your entry be 500 words, it’s okay for it to be 550. It’s maybe even okay for the piece to be 600 words. I wasn’t prepared for some of the pieces to be double the required length. That, unfortunately, disqualified a couple of entries. But I am happy about the list we have come up with and look forward to reading more Nepali writers!”

***Thank you for your submissions! It is because of your submissions that we can have more competitions in the future. Bigger and better ones! If your piece has been selected for publication, we will reach out to you shortly. Keep your eyes peeled for the next Walk With Me!***